Tracking Digital Espionage

12 February 2019

Ever wondered how much governments and private corporations really know about your online history? And what they might do with this information once they have it?

The Centre for International Security Studies presents Professor Ron Deibert, digital detective and founder of the Citizen Lab, in a talk that reveals the hidden censorship and surveillance systems underpinning digital espionage campaigns against human rights organisations, journalists, activists, and opposition groups around the world.

Joined by the co-founders of the Sydney Cybersecurity Network, Dr Aim Sinpeng and Dr Frank Smith, this event will explore the growing silent epidemic of targeted digital espionage against civil society and unpick the implications this has for us all.

Register your interest to attend by emailing ciss@sydney.edu.au

 

About the speakers

Ronald J Deibert is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. The Citizen Lab undertakes interdisciplinary research at the intersection of global security, ICTs, and human rights. The reports of the Citizen Lab are routinely covered in global media, including 25 separate reports receiving front page coverage in either the New York Times, Washington Post, Globe and Mail, or Toronto Star over the last eight years. Deibert is the author of Black Code: Surveillance, Privacy, and the Dark Side of the Internet (Random House: 2013), as well as numerous books, chapters, articles, and reports on Internet censorship, surveillance, and cyber security. In 2013, he was appointed to the Order of Ontario and awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal, for being “among the first to recognize and take measures to mitigate growing threats to communications rights, openness and security worldwide.”

Aim Sinpeng is a Lecturer in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney and co-founder of the Sydney Cyber Security Network. Aim is an award-winning educator whose research interests centre on the relationships between digital media, political participation and political regimes in Southeast Asia. She is particularly interested in the role of social media in shaping state-society relations and inducing political and social change.

Frank Smith is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney and co-founder of the Sydney Cyber Security Network. His research and teaching examine the relationship between technology and international security. His focus is on bio and cyber security: particularly on how inaccurate ideas about technology in these fields can influence decisions about war and peace.

Event details

  • When: 6.00pm - 7.30pm
  • Cost: Free
  • Contact:

    The Centre for International Security Studies

    T: 02 9351 7663

    E: ciss@sydney.edu.au 



Tracking Digital Espionage

When

12 February 2019


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